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Ventilator

Marathi Film     Black Comedy,     04 Nov 2016


Ventilator Marathi Movie Review – Priyanka Chopra produced Marathi film reminds you of Raju Hirani’s cinema!

 

Star Cast:
Ashutosh Gowariker as Raja
Jitendra Joshi as Prasanna
Sulbha Arya as Manda (Prasana’s Mother)
Sukanya Kulkarni-Mone as Sarika
Viju Khote as Shirish Appa
Satish Aalekar as Bhau
Deepak Shirke as Aatma Dhadke
Boman Irani as Doctor

Director: Rajesh Mapuskar
Producer:
Priyanka Chopra & Dr. Madhu Chopra
Story & Screenplay:  Rajesh Mapuskar
Music:  Rohan-Rohan
Lyrics:  Manoj Yadav, Shantaram Mapuskar
Cinematography: Savita Singh
Editor:  Rameshwar Bhagat
Art Director: Nikhil Kovale

 

Like: The performances by Jitendra Joshi, Ashutosh Gowariker and some other members of the cast are extra – ordinary.  There are many genuinely funny moments. The film has an emotional core that should strike a chord with the public.

Dislike: The film is a little too long. There are a little too many characters who add nearly nothing to the film. At times the film gets melodramatic which makes you disconnect.

Rating: 3.5/5 – A must watch!

The Review:

Story: Gajju Kaka is a much loved figure of the Kamerkar clan. When his beloved nephew (Raja) comes to know that he has been put on a ventilator after suffering from a stroke, he rushes to the hospital from a private screening for his star friend Priyanka Chopra. Also, a motley of relatives right from their native village to the ones already living in Mumbai swoop down upon the hospital; some out of love and care for the ill man, others to settle family disputes.

At its heart, though, Ventilator is a film about father-son relationships. Gajju Kaka and his son Prasanna don’t see eye to eye, and neither do Raja and his father. But the ventilator on which Gaju Kaka is put on goes on to teach the two sons more than a few life lessons.

Technical Aspects

    • Screenplay/Dialogues: The film has motley characters of every hue and shade. Each of them has their own individual quirks and the screenplay doesn’t shy away from milking it. Right from the old Tatya who has a weak bladder to Manda – the wife of the patient Gaju kaka – who repeats the events leading to the stroke her husband suffered to every person who asks, every character has been given a comic turn that makes the proceedings a hilarious affair! The most fleshed out characters, though, are Prasanna and Raja. Prasanna doesn’t really fit into the family and chose politics as a choice of career. The arc that his character goes through is one of the best parts about the film. A scene showing Prasanna getting back-stabbed in politics takes the cake in the nuanced screenplay.
    • Direction: Raju Mapuskar directs his own screenplay with a deft hand. The film is in the same mould as the likeable Ferrari Ki Sawari. It is something which can be branded as the Raju Hirani brand of cinema. A film that moves you enough to fall in love with it. Mapuskar has handled the huge cast exceedingly well.
    • Cinematography: Savita Singh’s camera work frames indoor shots smartly. She mixes up the angle to ensure that there is no repetitiveness in the conversation shots.
    • Editing: At 130 minutes, the film is a little too long. There are quite a few scenes that have been included just for laughs. Doing away with them would have made the film lot crisper.
    •  Music and Lyrics: The song Ya Re Ya is placed well in the film and also well composed.
    •  Star Performances:  Jitendra Joshi shows his versatility as an actor with this film. Along with playing the villain in Baji, this performance has to be one of his best. He brings out the vulnerability of his characters beautifully. A well cast Ashutosh Gowariker, plays his part with a natural ease. A long break from acting hasn’t really rusted his acting skills. Satish Alekar also makes an impact as the old father.In the huge supporting cast, Nikhil Ratnaparkhi stands out. Nearly every actor contributes to the film in bits and pieces with their punches. Priyanka Chopra’s cameo is also cute.

Final Verdict:  Funny and moving in the mould of Raju Hirani’s cinema, Ventilator shouldn’t be missed!